What To Do If You Believe That Your Child Has Autism

 

As a parent, you will always want what is best for your child. As a result, if you begin to suspect that they have a condition such as autism, you may be feeling concerned or even worried about what the future may hold for your child. After all, children with autism or related conditions experience life differently from their neurotypical peers and may need certain support fixtures in place to ensure they can reach their full potential. 

 

First things first, however, it’s important to remember that an autism diagnosis is not a bad thing. Therefore, if you are beginning to suspect that your child may have autism, it is important that you do not panic. We all have qualities that make us different from each other, and autism is simply one of these differences. Furthermore, those with autism can fully achieve their goals – no matter what they may be. That being said, getting that autism diagnosis can make a real difference to your child’s life for the better, as it means you’ll gain access to the appropriate support networks. 

 

According to recent reports, approximately 1 in 54 children in the US have been diagnosed with ASD, though it is also estimated that a quarter of kids with autism go undiagnosed. This is likely because autism manifests itself differently in each person – and there’s no ‘one-size-fits-all’ list of symptoms that you can apply to receive a diagnosis. 

 

Nevertheless, if you suspect that your child may have autism, there are certain steps you can take to ensure that you give them the support and love they need. For example, you should: 

 

Research the different signs of autism. 

 

As mentioned previously, no two people with autism will have the same experiences and symptoms, but parents can be on the lookout for certain signs of signifiers. As detailed by autism speaks, these symptoms may present themselves at different stages of your child’s development. For example, some of the earliest indicators of autism or a related disorder can be identified when a child is around six months old – such as limited eye contact or a lack of expression. Furthermore, when your child reaches their first birthday, you may notice a lack of babbling or chatter, alongside a lack of response to their name. 

 

Despite this, most autism diagnoses happen when children are around four years old – though boys are often diagnosed much quicker than girls. Other common symptoms of autism that you may notice during this time include: 

 

Autism Speaks have also put together a quick survey for parents who may be considering looking into their child’s behavior further, which could give you some of the answers you are looking for. You can try it out here.  

 

Speak to a health professional.

 

After doing your research, if you still feel your child may have autism or a related disorder, it is time to look into getting a diagnosis. In some cases, medical professionals may prefer to wait until your child is over the age of two before they diagnose them. This is because all children develop differently and at different rates, so early diagnoses are sometimes discouraged – even though they can be beneficial.

 

Doctors and health professionals will diagnose children based on behavioral studies – as there are no medical tests that can actually be carried out. Once your child receives a diagnosis, they will also provide you with information on what you can do to best support them moving forward. For example, they may consider that you look into therapy services

 

At Alee Behavioral, we have a range of different therapy and clinical services on offer that can be specifically tailored to each child. For example, if your child is non-verbal, we can support them through speech therapy. 

 

Make lifestyle changes.

 

Once your child has received a diagnosis, you will then introduce changes into your daily life that enable them to reach their full potential. In addition to connecting with therapists, this could include putting together a daily routine that helps your child thrive by providing them with structure. You’ll also be able to figure out ways to slowly and safely introduce your child to change without overwhelming them. For example, you could begin by scheduling ‘surprises’ into their daily routine – by adding a question mark to a calendar and displaying it within your home. This way, your child knows that they will be trying something new and can prepare themselves a little for these changes. 

 

Don’t panic.

 

As mentioned previously, the most important thing to remember if you believe your child has autism (or if they have just received their diagnosis) is that you must not panic. Autism will not stand in the way of their success in any way whatsoever – and getting that diagnosis means that you’ll be able to provide them with additional care and support.

Any questions? Give us a call!

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