Our ability to communicate with others, be it our family or peers, shapes our day-to-day lives. After all, it helps us form strong relationships, advocate for ourselves, and get to where we need to be (both professionally and personally).

However, children with autism and related disorders may find it harder than most to communicate with others. There are many reasons for this, but it’s primarily due to the fact that the way in which we communicate in our daily lives caters to neurotypical people over neurodiverse.

Not only does it require a certain level of language processing skills, but it often requires speakers to pick up on nonverbal cues, such as body language, too—something that many people with autism find hard to read. Beyond this, a significant number of children with autism are non-verbal or “have problems with the meaning and rhythm of words and sentences.”

As such, parents must work proactively with their children to help them develop the communication skills they need to thrive!

How To Help Your Child with Autism Communicate

Enroll them in Speech Therapy. Working with a speech-language pathologist is one of the most effective methodologies when it comes to helping individuals with ASD find their voice and improve their communication skills. During any given session, they will work closely with your child to help them develop a range of communication-based skills. For example, they may work on:

Child with Autism Communicate

Photo by Jason Rosewell on Unsplash

Work to understand their unique communication style.

Parents tend to know their children better than anybody else in the world. Working to better understand their unique communication style means they can express their needs more clearly, making their day-to-day life a little easier. For example, stimming could sometimes indicate frustration or feeling tired and overwhelmed.

State how you are feeling, as opposed to “showing it.”

While helping your child recognize the difference between certain facial expressions can help them to better understand emotional self-expression, you can make this process a lot easier for them by stating how you are feeling instead of merely showing it. For example, you could say:

“I am happy because….”
“I am sad because…”

The more you get into the practice of doing this, the easier your child will find it to understand emotions or how they manifest for others. It could also encourage them to open up about how they may be feeling.

Look into Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices.

For nonverbal children, AAC devices can prove to be instrumental in changing the way they communicate for the better. These tools can help them to participate more actively in conversations, express themselves creatively, and gain more independence in daily life. Speak to your child’s speech therapist beforehand to see which device is best for your child or to learn more about how you can integrate this into their daily routine.

In short, there are many different ways in which you can help your child with autism communicate!

A parent will always be their child’s biggest advocate. However, when your child is diagnosed with autism or a related disorder, your advocacy becomes all the more important.

Why is Autism Advocacy Important?

There are many reasons why autism advocacy is important. It can help to break down harmful stereotypes, challenge misinformation, and perhaps most crucially, build a more welcoming and inclusive world for neurodiverse individuals.

Furthermore, it can also help to raise awareness about autism and related disorders, which can increase acceptance and increase the amount of funding autism charities and research receive.

How To Advocate For Your Child With Autism


Start at home.

Advocating for your child often begins at home. Start by doing your research into autism, ensuring that all information is gathered from reputable sources. The more you understand the condition, the easier it will be to support your child throughout every stage of their life.

If you have neurotypical children at home, take the time to explain autism to them, too. They may have already noticed that their sibling acts slightly differently to them, but without having a concrete reason why, they may not know how to respond.


Speak to their teacher.

According to a recent study, few children have received an autism diagnosis before starting school. In fact,28% of students do not receive a formal autism diagnosis until they are teenagers.

As a result, you must keep your child’s teacher up to date, whether you’re considering looking into autism testing or have received a formal diagnosis. This can ensure that they put the proper provisions in place to support your child in the classroom, whether this means designing a sensory-friendly classroom or sticking to a clear routine each day.


Challenge negative assumptions.

Many people view an autism diagnosis as something inherently negative when it just means that your child sees the world in a slightly different way. As such, you should work to encounter this negative whenever you come across it. While speaking out can be hard, it shows your child that they should be proud of who they are and helps to break down some of the more persistent stereotypes relating to ASD.

You should also encourage your child to find their voice and speak up for themselves.


Remain involved in their therapy.

Therapy can play a key role in the life of a child with autism or a related disorder, helping them to develop the skills they need to thrive in any environment. Remaining actively engaged in their therapy, such as by attending sessions together or going over what they’ve learned each week, is another great way to support and advocate for your child. After all, it means that you are taking active strides toward making their day-to-day life a little easier.

If you’d like to find out more about autism therapies, including speech therapy and ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) therapy, please do not hesitate to get in touch today.

Any questions? Give us a call!

401-228-8303

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